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Boring Your Brand to Death

I’ve recently been tapped to write the advertising column for Omaha B2B magazine – a quarterly publication from the folks behind Omaha Magazine. My agency, Webster, redesigned the magazine’s layout, which you can see here (warning: requires, shudder,... read more

What a Fool Believes

To answer your first question, yes, the purpose of this entire column is to give me an excuse to use a Doobie Brothers song as the title. Why the Brothers Doob? Because in February of 1973 they charted with a cover of “Jesus is Just Alright” which would go on to form... read more

The Obligatory Super Hole VIII – The Uppity Armchair CD Edition

Welcome to the eighth annual edition of a futile exercise I call The Super Hole. This year, unlike Super Holes VI and VII, I’ll return to passing out letter grades along with proffering tidbits on how the spots could’ve been better. Granted, I could take the easy way out for all of them and just say, “Step 1: Hire me. Step 2: Leave me alone. Step 3: Drink in the genius.” But that would be rude. Very rude. Besides, some of these spots are actually quite good.

As usual: I only review ads shown during the four quarters of the game, so no pre- or post-game spots (although a couple sneak in). And no movie trailers, TV show promos, NFL ads or local ads.

Spots are arranged in alphabetical order according to brand. If I missed a couple, try one of the 8.3 million other blogs writing about this today.</p>

And if you helped make one of the ads that I ream, take solace in the fact that you worked on a Super Bowl ad. I worked on a blog about Super Bowl ads. I’d rather be getting reamed myself.

Audi, “Doberhuahua” – I love this spot, so I’ll just pick some nits. The banter between the dog show commentators could’ve been funnier, in the vein of “Best in Show.” I’m sure Fred Willard would’ve been available. The dog park scene could’ve used a smaller moment…

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Take two and die slowly

Fixing a brand is hard. Rarely does salvation arrive in the form of one product, tag line, commercial or initiative because a broken brand is rarely ill in just one area of operations. This fact, obvious though it should be, seems lost on too many brands. Forget... read more